Allen Ginsberg

Allan Ginsberg. ( "Allen Ginsberg." Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web.   21 Apr. 2015.)

Allan Ginsberg. ( “Allen Ginsberg.” Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 21 Apr. 2015.)

Part of our continuing series on the Wild Dog Collection by SHSU Special Collections intern Kara Stafford

Allen Ginsberg, born June 3, 1926 to Louis and Naomi Ginsberg, was a famous and popular Beat poet. Interestingly Ginsberg’s father was a writer and his mother was a member of the communist party. His mother also had an undiagnosed mental illness which led to her death via lobotomy. Ginsberg’s career as a Beat writer had its start his freshman year at Columbia University where he befriended future Beat authors Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, and John Clellon Holmes. Ginsberg, Kerouac, and Burroughs would become pivotal figures in the beat movement. Ginsberg was a voice in many political movements such as: free speech, Vietnam War protests, Gay rights, he supported drug use, and brought attention to Bangladeshi war victims. His political activism led to many arrests and even a stint in a mental institution for hiding stolen goods for a friend. He dated many men, one of which was William Burroughs. Ginsberg’s most notable and lengthy romantic relationship was with Peter Orlovsky. Their relationship lasted over 30 years, and even if they were on breaks they remained friends.
Ginsberg’s first major piece of Beat poetry is called Howl. He used his study in Eastern religions in his poetry through mantras, rhythm, and chants used for spiritual effects. His poems Who Will Take Over the Universe, which talks about protest and his view of government, and a poem titled simply From Journals-1963 , which is a funny piece about an alcoholic telling his wife how he wants his funeral to go, can be found in the SHSU Special Collections Wild Dog Collection. Who Will Take over the Universe can be found in, Series 2, Subseries 4, Box 8, Folder 6 page 31, for the published clean copy. A second, annotated copy can be found in Series 2, Subseries 1, Box 5, and Folder 5. From Journals-1963 can be found in Series 2, Subseries 4, Box 9, and Folder 4 on page 14. Like the first poem a manuscript version of the second can be found in Series 2, Subseries 1, Box 5, Folder 18.

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Ginsberg continued to produce great literary works throughout his life, win awards, and perform readings up until the last months of his life. He died on April 5, 1997 surrounded by friends and loved ones.

To view and read poems by Allen Ginsberg and learn more about The Wild Dog Papers, visit Newton Gresham Library’s Special Collections on the fourth floor of the Library.

http://library.shsu.edu/about/departments/specialcollections/

View a detailed finding aid of this collection at Sam Houston State University’s Archon page and see just what materials are in the collection.

https://archon.shsu.edu/?p=collections/findingaid&id=34&q=

Drew Wagnon

Cover of Issue 6 which contains the poem Ariba. It can be located in series 2, subseries 2, box 6, folder 10.

Cover of Issue 6 which contains the poem Ariba. It can be located in series 2, subseries 2, box 6, folder 10.

Part of our continuing series on the Wild Dog Collection by SHSU Special Collections intern Kara Stafford

Hugh Andrew Wagnon Jr., better known as simply Drew Wagnon was not only a beat poet but also one of the editors of the Wild Dog Papers a beat poetry magazine. In the Wild Dog collection, housed in the Thomason Room, you can find poetry by Drew Wagnon as well as read correspondence between Wagon and other beat poets, which offers a bit of interesting insight into Drew Wagnon the poet and Drew Wagnon the man. Many of the correspondence between Wagnon and other poets published in The Wild Dog are friendly and not very business oriented, which makes them very interesting. You can find Wagnon’s poems in issues 6,13,16,18. Wagons poems include Ariba, Poem, Alto, and Later. Ariba can be found in series 2, subseries 4, box 8, folder 6. Poem can be found in series 2, subseries 4, box 8, folder 13. Wagnon’s poem Alto describes a trip to Mexico and can be found in series 2, subseries 4, box 9, folder 1. Wagon’s last poem in The Wild Dog collection can be found in series 2, subseries 4, box 9, folder 3, it contains a very interesting view on the world.

Wagnon was married 3 times and outlived his last wife. Terry, Wagnon’s first wife helped him edit several editions of The Wild Dog Papers. In the correspondents section, found in series 1, subseries 1 and 2, boxes 1-3, you can read letters sent to her and Drew Wagnon from other beat authors.

Along with editing and writing poetry, Wagnon also had a variety of odd jobs, throughout his life, which included; electrician, housing inspector, high rise steel worker, printing press operator, and postal worker.
Drew Wagnon died on November, 4 2011, but he lives on through his amazing beat poetry.

To view and read Drew Wagnons poetry and The Wild Dog Papers visit Newton Gresham Library’s Special Collections in room 400 of the Library.

http://library.shsu.edu/about/departments/specialcollections/

View a detailed finding aid of this collection at Sam Houston State University’s Archon page and see just what materials are in the collection.

https://archon.shsu.edu/?p=collections/findingaid&id=34&q=

The Wild Dog Magazine: A Brief Overview

artwork for briefoverview.For the months of June and July, Out of the Box will be highlighting the Wild Dog Manuscript collection. Each article, written by SHSU Special Collection intern Kara Stafford, will highlight material from the collection and the authors who contributed to the literary magazine.  Enjoy!

The Wild Dog magazine is a literary magazine featuring Beat poetry. Beat poetry is mostly free verse poetry, it is often surrealistic. It was influenced by the cadences of Jazz as well as Native American and Zen spirituality. The Beat movement started in the 1950’s on the east coast; New York mainly. The core of the wild dog movement was Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. It later moved to the West Coast and San Francisco was the hub of Beat poetry by the 1960’s. Many Beat writers struggled to be published at first, because they did what they were told not too or were seen as “weird.” Many Beat poets got their start writing for The Wild Dog, a campus literary magazine started in Pocatello, ID. Beat poetry sees uncensored, authentic human thoughts as art and this is what made the movement and poetry so interesting.

The picture shown above can be found in The Wild Dog Collection, Series 2, Subseries 2, Box 6, Folder 20

To view and read The Wild Dog Collection visit Newton Gresham Library’s Special Collections.

http://library.shsu.edu/about/departments/specialcollections/

View a detailed finding aid of this collection at Sam Houston State University’s Archon page and see just what materials are in the collection.

https://archon.shsu.edu/?p=collections/findingaid&id=34&q=

Cover of Wild Dog #13

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The covers of Wild Dog magazine, a literary publication out of Idaho State University, have these great hand drawn covers. This is my personal favorite. I like it so much that I turned it into a GIF.

If you are interested in poetry or underground publications, the Wild Dog collection might have be up your alley.

View a detailed finding aid of this collection at Sam Houston State University’s Archon page and see just what materials are in the collection. https://archon.shsu.edu/index.php?utm_campaign=archon&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=tumblr&p=collections%2Fcontrolcard&id=34