Sexton Family Papers, 1844-1985

sextonbankruptcy

Franklin Barlow Sexton (1828-1900) was a successful lawyer, planter and member of the Texas Legislature in the 1850s. When the Civil War broke out, he served a time as a Confederate soldier before being selected as a representative of the Fourth Congressional District in the First Confederate House of Representatives. He served on various committees including: Commerce, War, Military and Tax. He was re-elected in August of 1863. This made him one of two Texans to have served on both terms of the Confederate Congress. After the war he relocated to San Augustin, Texas to continue  practicing law and served as attorney for the T. & P. Railway. His daughter, Loulie, married Harry F. Estill, a very popular and well-respected President of the Sam Houston State University who served in that office for 28 years.

The Sexton Family Papers comprises of correspondence, notes, business transactions and ephemera representing a part of the history of the life of Confederate Legislator, Franklin Barlow Sexton. The correspondence represents a wide range of personal and business communication. Some of the most common are in in regards to issues of deeds, receipts, requests for payment and memoranda. Newspaper clippings spanning a variety of topics, some of which are: agriculture, national defense, oil in Texas, poems and poets, churches and the history of Texas.

View a detailed finding aid of his collection at Sam Houston State University’s Archon page and see just what materials are in the collection.

https://archon.shsu.edu/index.php?utm_campaign=archon&utm_medium=referral&utm_source=blog&p=collections/controlcard&p=collections/controlcard&id=4

sextonmasonic

Tuition record for the Marshall Masonic Female Institute where two of Franklin Sexton’s daughters attended school.

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