#WBW – Are you smarter than a 1884 SHNI student?

Questions 1884jpg Questions 1884 p4 Questions 1884 p3

#WBW goes really way back to 1884 to see if you are you smarter than a student of the Sam Houston Normal Institute from 132 years ago.

This is a competitive examination from 1884 for the Sam Houston Normal Institute which is now Sam Houston State University. These exam were used to judge which 2 students from each legislative district in Texas would be sent, all fees paid, to SHNI by their respective senators.

So if you haven’t been totally drained from your final exams you might take a whack at some of the questions the students were asked 132 years ago.

P.S. I would love to know the answers myself.

Come and visit some other way back exams in the SHSU University Archives, room 400, of the Newton Gresham Library, M-F, 8-5.

#TBT – Repelling back to Recondo, CS143, KSHU 90.5, SHSU Observatory, and class gift gates.

The SHSU University Archives has a comprehensive collection from the 1900s through 2000s of what are called view books or informational booklets. These booklets are still produced for informing and enticing future students to attend Sam Houston State University. Today the view books are still sent to future students by the thousands. Now days this University information can also be found online which appeals to our tech savvy, social media loving, future students.

Above is the back cover of the 1982-1983 information booklet. The photographs are of KSHU 90.5, Computer Science 143 class, (note the C in the word computer is missing on the bulletin board behind the instructor), the ROTC repelling tower called the “Recondo,” the SHSU observatory which at the time was on top of the Farrington Building, and in the middle are two class gift entry gates that were at the original entrance to SHSU on Sam Houston Avenue.

To see more view books come visit the SHSU University Archives, room 400, of the Newton Gresham Library. We are open M-F, 8-5.

Happy National Agriculture Day!

AgPhoto-010

For over a 100 years the teaching of Agriculture has been a big part of Sam Houston State University.

For National Agriculture Day the University Archives thought it would be fun to show these four adorable sheep from the 1940s. This photograph was part of the 100th Anniversary of the SHSU Department of Agricultural Sciences and Engineering Technology. The Department of Agricultural Sciences and Engineering Technology held their big 100th Anniversary Celebration in 2011.

To see more Agriculture materials visit the SHSU University Archives.

#WBW – They called it, “The Giant.” Cybernetics comes to Sam Houston State College in 1967.

the Giant comptuer 1967

They called it, “The Giant.”

It arrived on campus in August of 1967. Its lair was room 107 in Sam Houston’s three year old Computer Center in the ACB Building (Academic Classroom Building- AB-1) where it sat purring all day long, absorbing information about the campus, its educational programs, its students and faculty. The price tag to feed this giant was $50,000 dollars per year in rental fees.

The “Giant” consisted of a room full of electronic equipment, storage, files and an IBM 360, Model 30, 25/19 data processing computer.

The University Library (now the Newton Gresham Library) would become one of the top users of The Giant. The Estill Library in 1967 was already using IBM automated typewriters and the tape produced by the IBM typewriters could be converted to tape readable data to be read by The Giant which would help the library in its automation plans.

If you worked on, “The Giant” or have photographs or materials about the early days of SHSU campus computing the archives would love to talk with you.

To learn more about the history of computers on the Sam Houston State University campus stop by the University Archives in room 400 of the Newton Gresham Library. The University Archives is open m-F, 8-5.

Happy 40th! Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum

Johnson Colisieum 75 76 jpg
 

 

The University Coliseum was completed and opened in December of 1976. Designed as a spectator facility where various sports and special events could be scheduled the coliseum is basically an open arena with a playing/performing court with 5,000 fixed seat and 3,200 other sides with folding bleachers or temporary seating. A circular concourse level surrounds the arena.

Designed by Fort Worth Architect Preston M. Garen and constructed by Waco Construction the new Health and Physical Education Building contract was let for $3,589,000 dollars. The new University Coliseum received awards for design excellence and was published in many professional journals.

Here are a few facts about the building when it opened:

1. There are 19 sections of seats labeled A through S with 18 entry ways.
2. There are 56 doorways.
3. 12 water fountains
4. 4 trophy cases
5. Four ticket offices
6. 36 cigarette urns
7. 24 trash cans that weigh 44 pounds apiece.
8. The press room was in the concourse.
9. The Coliseum contain 11, 752 square feet in the concourse area, 44, 666 square feet outside the concourse area, and about 78, 000 square feet in total.
10. The plastic seats alone are worth $178,000.
11. The building houses a 16,000 square foot playing floor made of a synthetic material called “sportstred.”
12. The glass, called “windowwall” decorates 6, 384 square feet of the Coliseum’s outside walls. It is bronze tinted with the aluminum around the glass having a bronze finish.

It remained the University Coliseum until the Texas State University System at its meeting of August 21, 1987, voted to name the coliseum in honor of former regent of the TSUS, Bernard G. Johnson of Houston, Texas. At the December 12, 1987 commencement program Bernard G. Johnson was the commencement speaker. During this commencement Johnson was also awarded an honorary Ph. D, as a Doctor of Philosophy and the University Coliseum was dedicated as the Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum.

This year the Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum will celebrate their 40th year of service. In that time changes in the building and the events that are held there have been varied from musical groups, commencements for the University and area high schools, basketball games, volleyball games, hurricane storm shelter, to a new sparkling cooper roof and a brand new floor.

The featured photograph is from, “The Presidents Report of 1975-76,” The completed building photograph shows the new building with a grassy area across the street from the building. Today that grassy area is across the street on Bobby K. Marks Drive and Bowers Boulevard and is a parking lot in front with intramural fields in the back.

Please come visit the University Archives in room 400 of the NGL to see more about the Bernard G. Johnson Coliseum. Also be sure to visit the Johnson Coliseum for a special exhibit on the history of the building.

“The Most Important Product of Spindletop was Men.”

Image

spindle top 1902

On January 10, 1901, the Spindletop well in Beaumont, Texas blew into history and started the modern oil industry in Texas. Spewing out into the East Texas sky at a rate of 200 feet high and 70,000 barrels per day, this huge gusher keep going till the 19th of January when it was finally brought under control.

This 1902 photograph of the Spindletop field is part of the Sam Houston State University Archives, J. L. Clark Collection. Dr. Joseph L. Clark was a History Professor at Sam Houston State Teachers College. Dr. Clark acquired a copy of this photograph from the Beaumont Chamber of Commerce to possibly use in his 1955, 4 volume book set, “The History of the Texas Gulf Coast; its History and Development.” This photograph never made it into his book.

In his book, Dr. Clark says that the most important product of Spindletop was men.  The Spindletop Oil Field was the training ground for the oil industry at the time. From drillers to geologists to financers, most learned their trade from their experiences at Spindletop.

You can read more about Spindletop (in chapter 30 of volume II) and Texas related history in Clark’s multi-volume title. The main collection of the Newton Gresham Library has a set you can check out at call number F392.G9, vol.1-4.

HAPPY 56th BIRTHDAY SAMMY!

Bearkat-038a

HAPPY 56th BIRTHDAY SAMMY!

On December 14th, 1959, during a basketball game the first ever Sammy the BearKat mascot costume was unveiled. In the years since then Sammy has undergone many changes to his appearance to morph into the Sammy the BearKat we know today.

This article from The Houstonian, 10/7/2003, gives a good overview of the various Sammy’s over the years.

To find out more about Sammy the BearKat come and visit the University Archives in room 400 of the Newton Gresham Library.

Happy 180th Birthday Samuel L. Clemens, better known as “Mark Twain.”

Mark Twain 1874335 - Copy

 

“The dictionary is the only place where success comes before work”- Mark Twain

Samuel L. Clemens was born in Hannibal, Missouri on November 30, 1835. The American author is overwhelming known by his pen name of Mark Twain. Born shortly after the appearance of Hailey’s Comet in 1835 Clemens said he came in with comet and would go out with it. His death came one day after the comet’s return on April 20, 1910.

His pen name of,”Mark Twain,” Clemens said came from Captain Isaiah Sellers who wrote down paragraphs of practical information and signed them Mark Twain and send them to the New Orleans Picayune. Clemens took up the pen name after Captain Sellers died in 1869.

The cover of the magazine featured in this post is from 1874 and was illustrated by R. T. Sperry. Note that the frog is reading the same title as the magazine.

The Special Collections Department in the Thomason Room of the Newton Gresham Library holds the Mark Twain Correspondence and Ephemera Collection, 1874-2002. This Twain collection is said to be one of the best in Texas.

Click here to go to the finding aid in the NGL Finding Aids Online:
https://archon.shsu.edu/?p=collections/findingaid&id=80&q=

Football Fun Fridays! The lighter side of 100 years of BearKat football.

SHSTC Football program 1948

This Sam Houston State Teachers College BearKats football program from 1950 is a colorful example of the artwork that went into the football programs in the 1930s-1960s. All the colorful animal cartoon figures represent the team mascots of football teams that Sam Houston State had played up to that point. This cover was done by Ed Dillion.

In this 1950 game, Sam Houston State Teachers College BearKats played the University of Corpus Christi Tarpons. The game was a blow out with the BearKats winning 46-0. The BearKats have a 6-0 and 201-32 points scored record against the Tarpons from 1950-1965. Two school records were also set in these games. The first in 1954 for the 11th longest pass of 81 yards for a touchdown thrown by quarterback Allen Boren to Bobby Baldwin. The second record was the 9th longest punt return of 70 yards for a touchdown set by Tommy Luker in 1964.

The University of Corpus Christi Tarpons started playing football in 1947 with the mascot of a tarpon. In 1966 the University of Corpus Christi football program was ended. In 1994 Corpus Christi State University was incorporated in the Texas A&M system and the student body then voted to become the Islanders but their mascot was known as Tarpy the Tarpon until 2004.

Special thanks to the Mary and Jeff Bell Library, Special Collections Department, at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi for the history of their football program and Tarpy the Tarpon.

To see this program and many other BearKat football programs from the past 100 years come visit the SHSU University Archives, room 400 of the Newton Gresham Library.

Football Fun Fridays! The lighter side of 100 years of BearKat football.

Alcalde 2003 20041978 00011949 Alumnus 1912 football1965 alcaldeAlcalde 1971 aalcalde 1937


Ricky Beck 1983138_2014a001_slide_undated_fl

 
Here in the University Archives we have looked at or scanned what seems like thousands of football related newspaper articles, photographs, and yearbooks during the 100th season of BearKats football.

So in this post the University Archives decided to pull out some favorites of the images and put them in one posting. See below for details about the images.

Top Row 1 – Left – Showing team spirit in 2003
Right – A mockup of Sports Illustrated magazine from The Alcalde, 1978

Row 2 – Members of the Sam Houston Normal Institute first football team in 1912 line up to reenact their formations. Among them is Len Baldwin who is said to have made the first touchdown in University history.

Row 3 – Left – Frank “Foxie” Fox jumps for joy as the Kats score against Concordia in the NAIA National Playoffs in 1964. Also showing excitement are cheerleaders Janet Miller and Rick Stowers. The game was a tie at 7-7.
Right – Go Sam Houston! The BearKats run for a touchdown in 1969.

Row 4 – Left – In 1983 Senior Ricky Beck gives his opinion of the BearKats chances in the game.
Right – In 1937 BearKat football was a welcome reprieve from the end of the Depression. In this picture from the 1937 Alcalde, the athletics photographer gets creative with the image. Note the Old Main Building spires in the background. This game was played at Pritchett Field.

Row 5 – In the 1980’s the BearKats played many games in the Astrodome in Houston. The Astrodome is now a shell but the BearKats will not forget playing in what was called the, “8th Wonder of the World.”

To see more football related materials come visit the SHSU University Archives, room 400 of the NGL, open 8-5, M-F.